Work starts on undersea power line installment

Huynh Kim

Representatives at the groundbreaking ceremony of the Phu Quoc-Ha Tien undersea power cable line installment project in Phu Quoc Island's Ham Ninh Commune on Sunday - Photo: Dinh Tuyen

Representatives at the groundbreaking ceremony of the Phu Quoc-Ha Tien undersea power cable line installment project in Phu Quoc Island's Ham Ninh Commune on Sunday - Photo: Dinh Tuyen

This is the final component of the project supplying power from the national power grid to Phu Quoc Island off the Mekong Delta province of Kien Giang.

The undersea cable links Ham Ninh Commune in the island with Thuan Yen Commune in Ha Tien town. The cable is the longest undersea power line in South East Asia with a total length of 55.8 kilometers worth around VND1.9 trillion.

Prysmian Powerlink SRL promised to complete the cable installment and its connection on January 13 so as to provide electricity to local people before the upcoming Lunar New Year holiday that falls in end-January.

Meanwhile, the 110 kV grid on the island including a 7.6-kilometer section and a 110/22 kV-40 MVA transformer station carried out by local contractors have been completed. In the mainland, EVN SPC has also invested in the 110 kV underground cable line running from Kien Luong to Ha Tien and the 110/22 kV Ha Tien transformer station that was put into operation in February.

The project costs roughly VND2.3 trillion which is funded by the World Bank’s loans and EVN SPC’s reciprocal capital. Residents in Phu Quoc Island so far have been dependent on power supply from the local diesel plant at a price tripling the mainland price. The island, however, always struggles with power shortfall even though its electricity supply has been raised from 5.8 million kWh to 64.5 million kWh over the past decade.

According to Kien Giang Province’s Department of Industry and Trade, the local power industry last year had to cover losses of up to VND157 billion for power generation on the island.

Phu Quoc Island welcomed nearly 500,000 tourists in 2012 and it is expected to welcome two to three million visitors annually in the next ten years. This means power demand in the island will pick up sharply, with some 1,386 kWh per capita annually projected from now until 2015, which rises to 2,614 kWh by 2020 and more than 4,200 kWh by 2030.

Advertisements